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Marching in Protest

Protest marches around country also include one in Denver

The+women%27s+march+in+Denver+allowed+nearly+100%2C000+local+residents+to+peacefully+voice+their+opposition+to+some+governmental+proposals+under+President+Donald+J.+Trump.
The women's march in Denver allowed nearly 100,000 local residents to peacefully voice their opposition to some governmental proposals under President Donald J. Trump.

The women's march in Denver allowed nearly 100,000 local residents to peacefully voice their opposition to some governmental proposals under President Donald J. Trump.

photo by Jack Puckett

photo by Jack Puckett

The women's march in Denver allowed nearly 100,000 local residents to peacefully voice their opposition to some governmental proposals under President Donald J. Trump.

Jack Puckett, Staff Writer

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The women’s suffrage movement in the early 20th century led to the 19th amendment being ratified in August, 1920, and finally provided women the right to vote.

Seventy years later, in 1992, hundreds of thousands of women marched on Washington to protect their bodies and their right to choose.

Now, in 2017, nearly 100 years after women received their right to a voice they are still fighting.

March 21, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump, people all around the world organized and put on display their support for the protection of women’s rights as well as their distaste for the new American President and his ideas.

Although the most notable march would likely be considered the one in the nation’s capital, which saw an estimated 500,000 people, there were marches all around the country with an estimated total of 3,000,000 people participating.

Locally, Colorado was no exception with a march in Denver reaching a number of protesters around 100,000.

Even more locally, Ralston Valley saw a portion of its students participate in the march, myself included.

Because I’m not 18 and not allowed to vote, I’m limited in the amount of influence I can truly have, and also how much of a voice I feel I have.

Despite lacking the means to practice the most obvious way to a voice, I, and many others still have things to say.

The women’s march was far more than just an outlet for the unheard, though, it was a chance for anybody to take a stand and voice their support in women’s rights. People were voicing their support both with rattle in hand and cane in hand.

The aura surrounding Trump’s step into office and also surrounding the Supreme Court vacancy is one of uncertainty and concern.

People are worried for the future and with reason.

With a majority Republican congress, a questionable Supreme Court, Donald J. Trump as the president and also issues like Planned Parenthood funding, repealing the affordable care act, and climate change, a feeling of uneasiness shrouds the future.
Denver’s women’s march was the soap box for thousands to stand on.

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